Thursday, October 11, 2007

Princeton Review's Best 170 Law Schools

Princeton_review_2008_2The Princeton Review has published the 2008 edition of The 170 Best Law Schools:

We surveyed more than 18,000 students at 170 law schools and used the information that they reported to us, along with school statistics provided by school administrators, to create 11 ranking lists (free registration required):

  1. Toughest to Get Into: Based on the Admissions Selectivity Rating.
  2. Best Classroom Experience: Based on student assessment of professors' teaching abilities, balance of theory and practical skills in the curricula, tolerance for differing opinions in class discussion, and classroom facilities.
  3. Professors Rock (Legally Speaking): Based on the Professors Interesting and Professors Accessible Ratings.
  4. Most Competitive Students: Based on law student assessment of: the number of hours they spend studying outside of class each day, the number of hours they think their fellow law students spend studying outside of class each day, the degree of competitiveness among law students at their school, and the average number of hours they sleep each night.
  5. Best Career Prospects: Based on the Career Rating.
  6. Candidates for Heritage Foundation Fellowships? (Students Lean to the Right): Based on student assessment of the political bent of the student body at large.
  7. Candidates for Center for American Progress Fellowships? (Students Lean to the Left): Based on student assessment of the political bent of the student body at large.
  8. Best Environment for Minority Students: Based on the percentage of the student body that is from underrepresented minorities and student assessment of whether all students receive equal treatment by fellow students and the faculty, regardless of ethnicity.
  9. Most Diverse Faculty: Based on the percentage of the law school faculty that is from a minority group and student assessment of whether the faculty makes up a broadly diverse group of individuals.
  10. Best Quality of Life: Based on student assessment of: whether there is a strong sense of community at the school, how aesthetically pleasing the law school is, the location of the law school, the quality of the social life, classroom facilities, and the library staff.
  11. Most Welcoming of Older Students: Based on the average age of entry of law school students and student reports of how many years they spent out of college before enrolling in law school.
For the Top 5 schools in each of these categories, see TaxProf Blog.

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