Thursday, January 17, 2008

Responses to Tamanaha on Interdisciplinary Legal Studies

1. Original Post by Brian Tamanaha at Balkinization.

2. Brian Leiter asks for comments . Read Matt Lister's and John Oberdiek's comments and Tamanaha's response.

3. Dan Solove has a thoughtful response at Concurring Opinions about the benefits that do accrue to students from having interdisciplinary teachers.

4. Ethan Leib comments at PrawfsBlawg, giving a good argument that non-elite schools ignore this trend at their peril.

5. I think that the trend just goes to show how much more it takes nowadays to join the legal academy, but also how many different paths you can take, which is a good thing.

I hope that Larry Solum will comment next.

2 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Non elite PRIVATE law schools (i.e., every school ranked outside the top 10 to 15 in US News)are higher education's version of the irresponsible sub-prime sharks for the responsible for the mortgage meltdown.

It is scandalous that there are 150 + schools out there (and more to come) charging in excess of 35K in tuition, and giving little value (sorry, but teaching from canned casebook guides could be done effectively by clinical faculty making far less) to the thousand of students they spam the market with.

I just wonder what the hundreds of dead-weight, non productive, tenured faculty members drawing salaries above productive members of other departments on their university campuses think when they look out at those poor eager 20 somethings knowing that their fate will be determined by an arbitrary come exam grading time.

Professor Tamanaha is exceedingly correct in pointing out the social justice implications of this situation!

1/18/2008 12:48 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Non elite PRIVATE law schools (i.e., every school ranked outside the top 10 to 15 in US News)are higher education's version of the irresponsible sub-prime sharks responsible for the mortgage meltdown.

It is scandalous that there are 150 + schools out there (and more to come) charging in excess of 35K in tuition, and giving little value (sorry, but teaching from canned casebook guides could be done effectively by clinical faculty making far less) to the thousand of students they spam the market with.

I just wonder what the hundreds of dead-weight, non productive, tenured faculty members drawing salaries above productive members of other departments on their university campuses think when they look out at those poor eager 20 somethings knowing that their fate will be determined by an arbitrary come exam grading time.

Professor Tamanaha is exceedingly correct in pointing out the social justice implications of this situation!

1/18/2008 12:50 PM  

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